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100 THINGS TO DO WITH BOOKS:
http://english.unitecnology.ac.nz/resources/resources/books.html
Here are some great activities for making book discussions and reports appealing to upper elementary students. Keep these creative starters on hand to use all year round.
 

abcteach: Book Report Forms
These printable forms guide students through the writing of book reports.
http://www.abcteach.com/directory/basics/writing/book_reports/

 

ACCORDION BOOK REPORTS:
http://www.teachercreated.com/lessons/000915pl.shtml
A good way for primary students to develop their first book report writing skills is through creating an accordion book. Find instructions here to take you through all stages of the project.
 
ACTIVITIES FOR ANY BOOK:
http://www.teachervision.com/tv/lounge/newsletter/literature/ll_anybook.html
How about building a museum based on your novel, or staging a debate between the characters? Find several creative suggestions to extend your class novels and interest students in the joy of reading.
 
ALL KINDS OF BOOKS!
http://www.teacherweb.com/TX/Cadwallader/CChavez
"I have developed a web page with creative publishing ideas. The site includes directions for Circle Books, Popup Books, Book in a Box, Envelope Books and much more. I have included ideas, projects and resources." Cathy Chavez
 

ALTERNATIVE IDEAS FOR BOOK REPORTING:
http://tst1160-35.k12.fsu.edu/Elbookreports.html
http://www.riverdeep.net/portal/page?_pageid=353,143072,353_143073&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
http://www.riverdeep.net/portal/page?_pageid=353,157846,353_157847&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
Try making a diorama of one scene of the story, or creating a character's room. Write a letter to a character,create a puppet based on the book, or try the paper bag reporting as outlined here. Students can also try crea-tive story response with Kid Pix, available in the 2nd link above. Use the 3rd link above for Storybook Weaver, which students can use to create a story extension, or
to make a different ending as an alternative book report.

 

A BOOK A WEEK INSTRUCTION:
http://curry.edschool.virginia.edu/go/wil/classroom_instruction.htm#Weekly_Instruction
The month of March includes resources for "Officer Buckle and Gloria", "One Windy Wednesday", and "The Very Hungry Caterpillar". Each title provides lesson suggestions and student activities.
 

Better Book Reports-25 Ideas!
Tired of the same old book report formats? Spice up those old book reports with some new ideas.
http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/lesson/lesson109.shtml

 

BOOK ACTIVITIES WITH BLACK HISTORY MONTH:
http://www.musickit.com/blackhistorymonth/
Find activities, music files, and songs here to explore the theme of Black History Month in your classroom. Books used include "Follow the Drinking Gourd", "My Dream of Martin Luther King", "Harriet and the Promised Land", and "When Marion Sang".
 
BOOK DIORAMAS:
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/crafts/diorama/book/
Collect all those shoeboxes and bring them to class; here's an engaging way to get students interested in reading and discussing books. Instead of a book report, have them create this "novel" diorama. Older students can try specific scenes or character rooms.
 

BOOKMARK REVIEWS:
 
http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=135
 Students will create their own bookmarks in lieu of book reports with this lesson plan. They will consider the author, plot summary, title, characters, illustration, and reaction in their planning and execution. Examples are included for "The Hobbit" by Tolkien, as well as a student Bookmark Planning Sheet and rubrics. You could consider creating a literacy bulletin board display for Reading Week with your student bookmark reviews, perhaps even sharing the project with penpal classes.

 

BOOK REPORT FORM:
http://www.abcteach.com/bookreports/genbookreport.htm
If your earlier grades are just starting to write complete or formal book reports on their reading assignments, try using this book report form to ease them into the process.
 
BOOK REPORT RECIPE:
http://www.teachersdesk.org/readreport.html
Copy out this unique book report recipe onto colorful, lively cardstock for a permanent bulletin board display in your classroom.
 

Book Report Rubric
Use with any multimedia book review.
http://www.ncsu.edu/midlink/bk.rep.fic.htm

 

BOOK REPORT TEMPLATES:
http://www.busyteacherscafe.com/worksheets/bookreport3.pdf
These book report templates point fourth grade students to the right path for reading responses, especially where they are required to give oral book re-ports.
 
COLOSSAL LIST OF BOOK REPORT IDEAS:
http://www.teachnet.com/lesson/langarts/reading/bookrepts1.html
Dozens of these ideas make for exciting, hands-on literary projects throughout the school year, as an alternative to the standard book report or for extra-credit work.
 
COMIC BOOKS AND CARTOON SQUARES BOOK REPORTS:
http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=195
Improve student involvement with class novel selections by offering them a new way to respond to their reading. Students will create comic strips based on characters, settings, and events, recreating key scenes and inventing their own dialogue. A planning sheet, an interactive comic creator, and comic strip rubrics are all included.
 
DESIGN A BOOK JACKET:
http://www.canteach.ca/elementary/novel44.html
What does a book's jacket say about the book itself? Or more importantly, what should it say? Students will consider their novel and then design a jacket according to samples viewed. Then let them take a turn and design according to what they think the book jacket should have included instead.
 
GRAB BAG ORAL BOOK REPORTS:
http://www.teachersdesk.org/grabbag.html
Reinforce story elements with this excellent idea for oral book reports. Students will select objects representing the different elements--characters, setting, plot, etc.--and give an oral presentation based on the prompts selected.
 
LITERATURE RESPONSES:
http://www.sdcoe.k12.ca.us/SCORE/actbank/sliterat.htm
Try something new for your students' literature responses with these activities. Choices include Geometric Characters, Interrupted Book Reports, Dialog Jackets, Found Poems, Literary Report Cards, and Collaborative Talks.
 
MORE IDEAS THAN YOU WILL EVER USE FOR BOOK REPORTS:
http://www.teachnet.com/lesson/langarts/reading/bookrepts1.html
To start you off with a wide diversity of creative possibilities, try this page for book responses to any novel. Interview characters, create dioramas, design costumes, write an original song, draw or paint a poster--these ideas can all be used with Seuss.
 
NOT YOUR SAME OLD BOOK REPORT:
http://www.teachnet.com/lesson/langarts/foldedbkrpts071599.html
Here are some great ideas for creative ways to examine books with your elementary students, including hands-on artistic projects. Scroll down the page for some cute tips on finding out if you're a "true" elementary school teacher.
 
PAPER BAG BOOK REPORTS:
http://www.eduref.org/cgi-bin/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Language_Arts/Reading/RDG0011.html
Here is an innovative idea for active presentations of student book reports. Each item that the student selects to include in their bag shows their comprehension and synthesis of reading material, including character and plot analysis.
 
PERSONAL RESPONSES TO A NOVEL:
http://www.teachersdesk.org/readnovel.html
Get past your basic book report formula with these unique takes on reading responses. Students can set their response to the tune of a familiar song, create a newspaper page for some element of their novel, rewrite a chapter, create a cartoon, along with many more stimulating and creative ideas.
 
REPORT WRITING IN THE PRIMARY GRADES:
http://atozteacherstuff.com/lessons/report_writing.shtml
For early report writing skills, try the format used at this site with whole class participation, hands-on activities, and listening skills emphasized.
 
PRINTABLE SHAPE BOOK TEMPLATES:
http://www.eduplace.com/rdg/hme/k_5/shapebook/toc.html
Choose them with or without primary writing lines, choose a treasure chest, a rainbow, mittens, an apple for fall, or how about a barn? Download and print your own student mini-books here for class writing exercises.
 
STICK AND RUBBER BAND BOOK;
http://www.makingbooks.com/elastic.html
This is a very simple book for your preschoolers to make. Use your finished book as a nature journal, to collect or illustrate leaves, insects, weather, etc.
 

SUMMARY, SYMBOL, & ANALYSIS IN BOOKMARKS:
http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=135
http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson135/bookmark_planning.pdf
http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson135/bookmark_rubric.pdf
Instead of doing book reports, students in middle school will be summarizing their books through a bookmark-making exercise. Use the 2nd link for a student planning worksheet, and the 3rd link for rubrics for the activity. (6-8)

TEACHING WITH DAILY BOOK BOOSTS:
 
http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=64
 Here's a terrific idea to spur reading, to help develop excellent book reports and responses, and to promote public speaking skills in students. They will share their book explorations in one minute "book boosts", done at the end of the school day. A book review form is included along with guidelines. (All)

 

THINK TANK:
http://thinktank.4teachers.org/
Think Tank provides an interactive option for helping students develop and organize their research projects. For grades three through eight.
 
WORD ATTACK BOOKMARKS:
http://www.busyteacherscafe.com/worksheets/word%20skills%20bk.pdf
Give out these printable bookmarks to encourage reading over the summer months, while giving your students the tools to attack unfamiliar words.

Contact:
Purpura, Linda 
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