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2 POETRY TEMPLATES:
http://www.berkeleyprep.org/lower/fourth/writing/i_dont_understand.htm
To ease students back into school and to start them off with some fun writing exercises, try these two poetry templates. Students will have the chance to explain what perplexes them in the "I Don't Understand" poem, then communicate to you what they liked best about their last year at school in the 2nd poetry template, "My Year in Grade..." . Consider illustrating the poems and displaying them for Open House night.
 
30 DAYS OF POETRY:
http://www.msrogers.com/English2/poetry/30_days_of_poetry.htm
This collection provides thirty different lesson plans, each with its own format for students to experiment with and "discover" that they actually enjoy this genre of creative writing. Many of the formats contain templates, making it easy for reluctant writers to commit themselves to the task.
 
INTERACTIVE ACROSTIC POEMS:
http://www.readwritethink.org/materials/acrostic/
This is a very cool tool for elementary students to explore poetry in an interactive, fun, and friendly format. Students will choose a theme, then brainstorm up to eight words for their topic. As they click forward through the exercise, the acrostic generator offers suggestions for each letter of their chosen theme word to start them off. A printable version is offered when the students are satisfied with their final copies.
 

ME & MY FAVORITE THINGS ACROSTICS:
http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=309
Great for a beginning of the year writing project, elementary students are guided through writing their own name acrostic, as well as an acrostic based on one of their very favorite things. They will illustrate both poems on chart paper, and mount them for a perfect display for Open House Night.

 

ALLITERATION AND HEADLINE POEMS:
http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=81
http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson81/headlinepoem.pdf

Students must first locate several examples of alliteration in poems, and then create their own--using a model for headline poetry. Several examples and a student worksheet are included.  A student assignment handout is available to download and print out, using the 2nd link above.
 
AMERICAN DREAM SONGS:
http://www.onlinepoetryclassroom.org/how/LessonPlan.cfm?prmLessonPlanID=13
High school students will be exploring poems written by Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and poems by American Women in this unit incorporating American culture into an in-depth study of poetry. After researching their topic, students will have the choice of teaching a lesson, writing a comparative essay, creating a web page, creating a digital audio file, or writing their own poems according to given formats.
 
AMERICA IN POETRY:
http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=194
Varying Views of America are discussed through the works of three major American poets, including Langston Hughes, Walt Whitman, and Maya Angelou. Students will use handouts and worksheets to examine perspective and analyze the featured poems, creating summaries, identifying voice and tone, and contrasting and comparing. Students also have the option of writing their own poems on the same subject.
 
ANIMAL POEMS:
http://teachers.net/gazette/MAY03/images/POEM.pdf
http://teachers.net/gazette/MAY03/images/POEMsample.pdf
What kinds of animals do your students like? Give them a chance to tell you all about their favorite pets, in poetry formats. Use the 2nd link above for a written sample to guide your students on how to fill out these templates. Attach a photo that the student can bring in from home, and make a great Parent Night or Open House display for your classroom bulletin board.
 

APRIL is NATIONAL POETRY MONTH
http://www.atozteacherstuff.com/Themes/National_Poetry_Month/

 

THE ART OF POETRY:
http://volweb.utk.edu/Schools/bedford/harrisms/3lesson.htm
Consider hosting your own annual Sidewalk Poetry Festival, involving the whole school and following the general format offered in this lesson plan.
 
AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL POEM TEMPLATE:
http://www.berkeleyprep.org/lower/fourth/writing/auto-bio_poem.htm
Who are your students, each of them, as individuals? Help them express themselves with this "I Am ... " poetry template, great for a beginning of the school year exercise.
 
ACROSTIC AUTUMN POEM:
http://www.teach-nology.com/worksheets/misc/fall/poem/
Here's an easy way to get your students writing poetry, using this printable autumn acrostic poem format. Have your students locate pictures of fall first to get inspiration, perhaps even creating a fall collage to go with their poems.
 
BRINGING POETRY AND CHILDREN TOGETHER:
http://www.ncte.org/library/files/Files/Cyberbriefs/Poetry.pdf
Download a PDF file here with a discussion and several tips for classroom teachers, on how to make teaching poetry to elementary students a successful and enjoyable experience.
 
THE BUTTON JAR:
http://www.poetryclass.net/lessonq.htm
Create a character based on a button? You bet... This visualization exercise works backward to develop a full character profile for creative writing activities.
 
Can I Have a Word?
http://www.barbican.org.uk/canihaveaword/
..this site, which recently won the education Webby award, contains projects that include readings by British poets, visual components, and lesson plans for expanding the creative writing of students
 
CHANTS AND STREET RHYMES:
http://teacher.scholastic.com/lessonrepro/lessonplans/profbooks/chantsstreetrhymes.pdf
Several chants illustrate the appeal and rhythm of this classic type of poetry, designed to be orally enjoyed. Explore how chants use rhythm and repetition to create a beat, then draft your own poems and try them out with jump ropes.
 
CHRISTMAS ALLITERATIONS:
http://www.abcteach.com/Christmas/alliterations.htm
Print out copies of this worksheet to have your students create their own holiday alliterations--or even better-tongue twisters just for Christmas.
 

CINQUAIN INTRODUCTIONS:
http://home.att.net/~teaching/langarts/friendsh.pdf
Here's a novel activity for breaking the ice when your students get back to school. They will interview a classmate, based on the guided questions, and then use those responses to fill in the form for the cinquain. Finally, they will read their completed cinquains aloud and introduce their new friend.

 

CINQUAINS WITH PARTS OF SPEECH:
http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=43
Combine a poetry exercise with a grammar lesson at the same time, following this format for upper elementary classes to create their own cinquain parts-of-speech poems. Student worksheets, teacher guidance, handouts, and organizers are all available to download with this activity.
 
COIN POEMS:
http://www.teachers.net/lessons/posts/138.html
Are your primary students having any problems remembering what each coin is worth? Try teaching these jingly poems to help them with money math.
 
COLOR POEMS:
http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=375
The varied sensations inspired by colors become the subject for these poetry exercises, using metaphor and expressing feeling. Examples are included, along with color poem templates.
 

EXPLORING POETRY IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM:
http://www.drjean.org/html/monthly_act/act_2005/05_May/pg06.html
You'll find great tips here for rhyming words, sound scrambles, letter recognition, decoding skills, or exploring syllables, all though poetry.
 

EXPLORING RHYME:
http://www.alfy.com/teachers/teach/thematic_units/Poetry_Rhyme/PR_1.asp
With internet resources, explore the world of nursery rhymes, rhyming games, and poetry through a wide variety of samples. Find a Rhyme Machine, A Pocketful of Rhymes, Silly Stories, Barking Spiders, and more.
 
FAVORITE THINGS POETRY:
http://www.poetryclass.net/lesson12.htm
Elementary students can learn how to convert lists to poetry with this fairly easy lesson plan. Student poems are included for examples.
 
FIFTEEN POEMS YOU CAN WRITE RIGHT NOW!
http://www.poetryexpress.org/15poems.htm
Tell a story, take a snapshot, shift perspectives... Find fifteen poetry lessons here to explore different formats and forms for enjoying and exploring the world of poetry with your middle school students.
 
FILL IN THE BLANK POETRY:
http://www.eduref.org/cgi-bin/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Language_Arts/Writing/WCP0200.html
Student poetry handouts are included with this creative writing exercise, where, after analyzing short works by poets such as William Carlos Williams, your class will create their own poetry, learning structure and meaning by filling in blanks of missing words in famous poems. Compare the results to the original at the end of the exercise.|
 
FORMATS FOR HOW TO WRITE POEMS:
http://www.poetryteachers.com/poetclass/poetclass.html
Try poetry theater, poetry contests, and giggle poetry, then find numerous templates here to help your students create their own poems, from Limericks to Tongue Twisters, or Haikus to Backwards Poems.
 
FORMING FLUENT READERS WITH POETRY:
http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=22
Students will be using an oral reading of "Casey at the Bat" online to address, analyze, and recognize meaning, intention, characterization, emotions, and literary elements in poems. They will also rehearse and perform a poem of their own choice; a performance critique sheet is included.
 
FOUND POEMS AND PARALLEL POEMS:
http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=33
Students will become attuned to powerful language when they begin looking for particularly descriptive passages in newspapers and literary texts. They will select passages and words and rework them into their own "found poems" following the directions here. Resources include models, rubrics, and instructions.
 
FRIDGE POETRY ONLINE:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/poetry/wordplay/game.shtml
Choose your category, select a background, and then click and drag your words to create your own "refrigerator" poetry with this online poetry game site from BBC.
 
GETTING TO KNOW YOU POEM TEMPLATES:
http://freeology.com/formsforteachers/pdf/iampoem.pdf
You can use these poetry templates for summer school, or save them for the beginning of the school year for a great exercise in getting to know your students, allowing them to have their say about what is important to them and what makes each of them unique.
 
HAIKU STRAW PAINTING:
http://www.kinderart.com/across/haikustrawpainting.shtml
Learn the form of haiku poetry and Japanese brush painting at the same time with this lesson plan. Students will be creating their own ink and brush paintings in order to illustrate their written haikus.
 

 MAGNETIC HAIKU:
 http://www.pbs.org/parents/creativity/ideas/haiku.html
 Have fun playing with your poetry! Students can rearrange any of these "magnetic" fridge-type poetry pieces, placing them on the lines to create a haiku. They have to pay attention to the number of syllables in each line for this format, or an error message will occur. Be sure to print out your haikus and share them after. (6-8)

 

TEACHING HAIKU POETRY:
http://www.gardendigest.com/poetry/haiku4.htm

 
HARRY POTTER HAIKUS:
http://www.factmonster.com/spot/haikuharry.html
Real wizards write haiku poetry... If your students are wild about Harry Potter and his world, then have them incorporate characters, events, or settings from the novels into haiku poetry, following the examples and instructions given here.
 
HIGH SCHOOL POETRY ACTIVITIES:
http://bxscience.ny.schoolwebpages.com/education/components/docmgr/download.php?sectiondetailid=491&fileitem=632&catfilter=ALL
Download a file full of poetry activities appropriate for middle and high school students, including poetic exercises to access subjects across the curriculum.
 
HOW TO MAKE A POEM:
http://www.poetryclass.net/lessonm.htm
This poetry writing lesson can be used across all grade levels, and equally enjoyed by all as well. Students will first divide and cut their papers, list ideas, similes, words, etc. that they like on those slips of paper, and then try and put them all together like a puzzle. Find further instructions here.
 
HOW TO TEACH POETRY:
http://www.poets.org/page.php/prmID85
Not all high school students respond well to poetry instruction, and teachers are sometimes at a loss as to how to teach this subject effectively. This site offers teachers a wealth of resources, from teaching ideas and tips to curriculum units, with resource centers and standards links included.
 
HOW TO WRITE -- POETRY CLASS:
http://www.poetryzone.ndirect.co.uk/resouce.htm
If you need some inspiration on how to teach your students various forms of poetry, try this site. It offers several fun exercises along a wide variety of formats--something for everyone--with instructions and examples.
 

Hughes, Langston
The Year was 1902 . . .and the great American poet Langston Hughes was born
 today in Joplin, Missouri. He celebrated black American life and culture in his writings, helping to shape American literature and leading the Harlem Renaissance writers' group. Learn more about Hughes, his life and his works:
http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/83

 

"I AM" POEM TEMPLATE:
http://teams.lacoe.edu/documentation/classrooms/language/donner/activities/I_Am_Poem.pdf
Use this "I Am" poetry template for students to write poems about themselves, or about any of the characters they are studying in class novels.
 
IMAGINATION AND WORDS:
http://www.poetryclass.net/lesson10.htm
Divide your class into teams for this poetry exercise; each group will complete word association games to create lists of abstract nouns, concrete nouns, and adjectives. Lining up, they will say their word and thus create a title, using that title to write a poem.
 
IT'S A MYSTERY!
http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1999/4/99.04.06.x.html
For 3rd to 5th grade classes, this unit addresses the detective story through a variety of fun activities surrounding a mystery poem. Character mapping worksheets are included, along with phonetic, cause and effect, and geography exercises.
 
The Year was 1809 . . . January 19
and American poet and author Edgar Allen Poe was born today in Boston, Massachusetts. To learn more, try the following web site for a chronology on the life and career of Edgar Allen Poe:
http://www.eapoe.org/geninfo/poechron.htm
 
Instant Poetry Forms
http://ettcweb.lr.k12.nj.us/forms/newpoem.htm
Instant Poetry Forms consists of more than sixty interactive literacy activities. Students can point, click and add words to the frame of a poem. With a quick click on the button below the form, the writer's words are magically added, completing each line. At that point, poets are invited to export their draft into a word processor for further revision and editing, (choose font, clip art, a border, etc.) An interactive poetry form finder on the website categorizes the forms by topic (or language skill) to help literacy teachers find just the right form for the mini-lesson of the moment. An interesting, fun tool.
Grade Level: Early Childhood (K-2), Elementary, Middle School Content Area: Arts (Literature), Arts (Poetry), Community Interest (Leisure), English (Writing) [Dewey #811] Application type: Tools
 
A JOURNAL OF POETRY:
http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1989/2/89.02.01.x.html
Four lesson plans explore the formats, vocabulary, and imagery of poetry. Guidelines for teaching poetry are also included, along with tips on how to experience poetry.
 
KNOWING OURSELVES THROUGH POETRY FORMS:
http://www.col-ed.org/cur/lang/lang35.txt
Middle and high school students may well be able to express their emotions, hopes, and fears through written expression. Here are a few templates to make the process easy; find further instructions here.
 
THE LIVE POETS' SOCIETY:
http://www.riverdeep.net/current/2001/01/012901_m1_slam.jhtml
Video clips supplement this article on Slam Poetry, illustrating the vibrancy of this medium for teenage expression. Plan your own Slam Poetry night or host an inter-class or even an inter-school competition.
 
MAGNETIC POETRY:
http://www.kinderart.com/across/magpoetry.shtml
You don't need to buy a poetry kit to create magnetic poetry; you can create your own with a magnetic strip roll. Use whichever words your students can think of, then post them to a magnetic surface in your classroom for an ongoing, interactive poetry exercise.
 
MAKE A POETRY QUILT:
http://teacher.scholastic.com/lessonrepro/lessonplans/poetryquilt.htm
Create a class project here that combines art, math, and language arts as your class collaborates to design and compose a poetry quilt. Find instructions here.
 
National Poetry Month - The Academy of American Poets
http://www.poets.org/page.php/prmID/5
Inaugurated by the Academy in April 1996, National Poetry Month (NPM) brings together publishers, booksellers, literary organizations, libraries, schools, and poets around the country to celebrate poetry and its vital place in American culture.
 
National Poetry Month @ Scholastic
Study the genre of poetry by taking part in step-by-step workshops with favorite authors. Then publish your poems online in Scholastic's Poetry Anthology or I Spy Riddle Library.

http://teacher.sc holastic.com/writewit/poetry/index.htm
 

National Poetry Month - APRIL
 
http://www.atozteacherstuff.com/Themes/National_Poetry_Month/


 

NEWSPAPER POETRY:
http://teachers.net/lessons/posts/1207.html
Parts of speech and imagery form the focus of this lesson plan, where high school students will evaluate the power of words and the imagery and sounds they create. They will cut words from different sections of the newspaper, finding various parts of speech. They will then discover a pattern and form an image, sharing their final results.
 
OCEAN POETRY:
http://pao.cnmoc.navy.mil/educate/neptune/lesson/language/poetry.htm
After completing initial research on the ocean, students will begin and then trade poetry efforts, one person starting the poem, the exchange partner finishing. Other suggestions include trading poetry to have a partner illustrate the poem. You could also create a class poem or even a pen pal poem, by letting each student contribute one line--upon which the next student must build. Try using a theme which draws on emotional responses, such as endangered water features or species, or pollution of the world's oceans.
 

PAINTING POETRY PEBBLES:
 
http://www.kinderart.com/across/poetry.shtml
 If you can't have a green garden in your classroom or at your school, then try creating a poetry pebble garden instead. Have your students decorate pebbles with paint, then choose words from a word list to write on them, according to your grade and skill level. You can create your poem as a class once your pebbles are all dry. Make a new poem each week for a changing poetry garden vista that your whole school can enjoy. (All)

 

PERIODIC ELEMENTS POETRY FORMS:
http://teachers.net/lessons/posts/1297.html
Poetry and chemistry? Of course... Find instructions and templates here to create a language arts, science, and art lesson all in one.
 

A POEM A DAY FOR HIGH SCHOOL:
 
http://www.loc.gov/poetry/180/
 
http://www.loc.gov/poetry/180/p180-howtoread.html
 Poetry 180 was designed by former U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins in order to provide high school students with a poem a day, for each of the 180 days of school. Collins has also included an article for students and teachers on how to read a poem aloud (use the 2nd link above). This site provides an easy way to introduce poetry to your students on a regular basis, with all poems selected specifically for a high school audience.

 

 POEMS FOR PRESCHOOL:
 http://www.craftbits.com/viewProject.do?projectID=231
 http://homepages.ius.edu/ALNICHOL/frog.gif
 Attach these poems to an art project, just for preschool classes. For instance, when learning the poem, "Fuzzy Wuzzy Caterpillar", make a caterpillar very simply from colored construction paper circles, and print one line of the poem on each circle for your preschoolers to assemble into their caterpillars, with a smaller circle left blank for the head. You can write the numbers for reading and sequencing on the back of each circle. Use a green circle with the text for the poem, "The Frog" attached for the body of a frog, with a smaller rounded triangle for its head - don't forget to draw on a froggy face and add legs. Use the 2nd link above for an example of how to draw or put together a simple frog. Kindergarten classes could use the butterfly poem to illu strate the life cycle of the egg on a green construction paper leaf, followed by a caterpillar (perhaps munching a leaf), and finally a beautiful, bold butterfly at the bottom of their page, with the poem either written on its wings, at the top of the page, the bottom, the back, or on a fold-out, like a card. (PreK)

 

 POETRY FOR THE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM:
 http://www.cis.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1991/4/91.04.06.x.html
 Oral recitation of poetry - who wants to go first? What, not many hands popping up? Then try this unit to inject some excitement into both your teaching experience for this subject, and the students' responses. Three lesson plans are included. (3-6)

 

Poems for Upper Elementary Students
 
http://falcon.jmu.edu/~ramseyil/poemiddle.htm

 

 POETRY FORMATS TO TRY:
 http://www.poetryteachers.com/poetclass/poetclass.html
 Try any of these ready-to-go poetry formats to ease your students into poetry; who knows, they might actually find out they're enjoying writing it! A Performing Poetry guide is also included. (3-9)

 

 POETRY OUT LOUD AUDIO GUIDE:
 http://www.poetryoutloud.org/poems/audiocd.html
 This resource provides a wonderful auditory introduction and poetry experience for students in middle and high school grades. Several well known poets, actors, and poems provide an opportunity to experience poetry "out loud", with some background learning material provided in a casual format. (8-12)

 

 POETRY PASSPORT:
 http://www.poetryclass.net/lessonp.htm
 Students will use words to paint a picture of themselves. You may wish to review terms such as "metaphor", "simile", or "personification"; a sample format is included here. (3-5)

 

Poetry Theater from Giggle Poetry
 
http://www.gigglepoetry.com/poetrytheater.aspx

 

Poetry Unit

 

Poets.org for Educators
http://www.poets.org/page.php/prmID/6
Here you will find a wealth of resources, including Teacher Forums where teachers can share ideas and seek help from colleagues; Pedagogical & Critical Essays about poetry; extensive links to relevant websites; Curriculum Units & Lesson Plans; biographies of hundreds of poets; and nearly two-thousand poems housed.
 

PICKLED POEMS:
http://pbskids.org/lions/anywhere/c_pecos.html
Children love rhymes of any kind, and they will especially enjoy the rather "silly" exercise of making up their rhymes to fit coins. Allow them to make nonsensical rhymes at this age--they will still get the idea. You might also wish to have them, at each one's turn, pick up the coin they wish to make a rhyme for, thereby establishing correspondence and recognition of value to the object.
 
PLAYING AROUND WITH POETRY:
http://english.unitecnology.ac.nz/resources/units/poetry/home.html
There are many resources here to draw from when building this unit on introducing poetry to your students, with two main goals of appreciating poetry and presenting poetry.
 
POETRY FOR UPPER ELEMENTARY STUDENTS:
http://falcon.jmu.edu/%7Eramseyil/poemiddle.htm
Why not have a poem of the week posted on your bulletin board to foster a love of wordsmithing with your students?Find several excellent examples here, chosen for grades three through five. (As always, please ensure all links are currently acceptable before allowing any student access.)
 

POETRY FOR UPPER ELEMENTARY STUDENTS:
http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1991/4/91.04.06.x.html
One of the best ways for students to enjoy poetry is to have fun reciting poems. This unit outlines various ways to introduce poetry to your students in three lesson plans, with procedures and guided questions included.

 

POETRY AND THE NEWS:
http://www.riverdeep.net/current/2001/12/120301_osgood.jhtml
Like many people, Charles Osgood (CBS, The Osgood File) often found the news almost too wacky to be believable, no matter how true it was. So instead of reporting the five W's in standard paragraph format he started using stanzas instead. How fun can an exercise like this be? After reading about Osgood and sampling some of his work, let your students try their hand at beat reporting with the writing activities available at this site.
 
POETRY LESSONS FOR TEACHERS:
http://volweb.utk.edu/Schools/bedford/harrisms/spotlight.htm
This wonderful compendium of over twenty-five poetry lessons provides a ready-made unit to use with your secondary English classes. The lessons progress in depth and experience as they go along, but they can also be used independently. Evaluation and rubrics suggestions are also included.
 
Poetry Lesson Plans
The lessons presented here focus on appreciating poetry — reading, discussing, and enjoying poems — rather than on the writing of original poetry. Several of the lessons emphasize the pleasure in the words and sounds of poems as place to begin — reminding students that poetry is art, and that it is satisfying and exciting to discover a poem that enthralls you and to say it in your own voice.
http://www.favor itepoem.org/forteachers/lessonplans.html
 
POETRY LISTENING BOOTH:
http://www.poets.org/audio.php
Find wonderful audio clips of poets reading some of their most loved works, including Robert Frost reading "The Road Not Taken", and "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks.
 
THE POETRY OF ART AND CREATIVITY:
http://www.huntington.org/Education/lessons/HSG-poetry-of-art.htm
As famous poets before them, your students will have the chance to respond to works of art with words. Critical observation is key, as is an active imagination. Follow the instructions here to view art slides, conduct a class discussion, examine a chosen painting by perceiving artistic elements, and then write a poem about the work.
 
POETRY PEBBLES:
http://www.kinderart.com/across/poetry.shtml
If you can't have a green garden in your classroom or at your school, then try creating a poetry pebble garden instead. Have your students decorate pebbles with paint, then choose words from a word list to write on them, according to your grade and skill level. You can create your poem as a class once your pebbles are all dry. Make a new poem each week for a changing poetry garden vista.
 
POETRY SEASONS:
http://atozteacherstuff.com/lessons/seasons.shtml
Students will divide into teams and be assigned one of the four seasons. In order to best defend their season, they must create a descriptive poem to show why it is such a wonderful time of year. Help students get started on this project by creating class word banks for each group.
 
POETRY SORTING:
http://www.collaborativelearning.org/poetrysort.pdf
How do you get your students interested in poetry? Why not try a poetry sort, creating your own collection of classroom poetry and sharing at the same time. This file suggests various ways in which you can divide or organize your collection. Ask students to think outside the given cards and challenge them to find their own unique poems and/or classifications as well. Use from elementary through to high school.
 
INSTANT POETRY TEMPLATES:
http://ettcweb.lr.k12.nj.us/forms/newpoem.htm
Find poetry templates for virtually any occasion or exercise; great for getting students motivated and enjoying the poetic experience, for an introduction to either creative writing or studying the great poets.
 

POETRY TERMS BOOKMARKS:
 
http://www.educationoasis.com/curriculum/Printables/PDF_Doc_files/BKMpoetryterms.pdf
 From alliteration to a stanza, print out copies of these bookmarks for middle to high school students to prompt them on poetic terms. (6-10)

 

POETRY WORKSHOP:
http://teacher.scholastic.com/writewit/poetry/karla_home.htm
Have your students meet the author, then sit back and relax for this poetry workshop, a sure way to have fun in the process of creative writing. A Teacher's Guide is included, along with assessment and rubrics guidelines.
 
POETRY WORKSHOP -- SIMILES AND METAPHORS:
http://www.poetryclass.net/lesson2.htm
In a whole class collaborative exercise, students will create their own vocabulary lists, following subject cards. They will discuss imagery and comparison of objects to other, unrelated items, creating lists of potential metaphors and similes. Finally, they will choose a subject and write their own descriptive poem.
 
READING AND UNDERSTANDING POETRY:
http://www.wisc.edu/writing/Handbook/ReadingPoetry.html
Find tips here to learn how to read and enjoy poetry. Included are guidelines for closely examining poems, looking at their subjects and tones, considering word choice, forms, patterns, rhythm, divisions, and allusions.
 
SEASONAL HAIKU:
http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=39
Create seasonal word banks with students, exploring different parts of speech to extend their lists beyond nouns. They will then follow the traditional haiku format in order to write their own fall haikus, and finally display their poems on appropriately-themed background images. This project makes a great Open House display, or collaborate with another class to mount your own hallway display in your school.
 

 SONGS MY TEACHER TAUGHT ME:
 http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/17108
 Three lesson plans and a Teaching Guide explore the concepts of speaker, style, imagery, context, self and society, dialogue, and the students' views on poetry in general. Guided questions, student activities, and student writing assignments are all covered with an excellent selection of poems for the unit. (9-12)

 

Steps Toward Writing Poetry:  The Year was 1902 . . .February 1 and American poet Langston Hughes was born today in Joplin, Missouri. Explore Black American poetry with elementary students in the unit below, Steps Toward Writing Poetry:
http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/guides/1991/4/91.04.05.x.html
 
TECHNO-POETRY:
http://henson.austin.apple.com/edres/shlessons/sh-poetryunit.shtml

 
TEACHING POETRY:
http://teacher2b.com/creative/poetry.htm
Several different poetry formats and lessons help middle to high school students gain a sense of poetry, as well as an appreciation and enjoyment of it. Find twelve mini-lessons here to investigate the fun in poetry.
 
THIS IS JUST TO SAY:
http://www.poetryclass.net/lessonb.htm
William Carlos Williams' poem, "This is Just to Say", will be read and discussed as a preliminary exercise in this creative writing activity. Students will consider both the author's use of language and his purpose, and then brainstorm to create their own "This is Just to Say" poems.
 
Types of Poetry
These are just a very few example of different types of poetry. Most of the definitions has at least one example of each particular type of poetry for better understanding.
http://www.shadowpoe try.com/resources/wip/types.html
 
USING POETRY TO TEACH READING & WRITING:
http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=152
Students will explore language and writing through poetry portfolios, where a weekly poem is examined, illustrated,and shared. Find further directions here.
 
A VIEW FROM A WINDOW:
http://www.poetryclass.net/lessonj.htm
Students will work in groups to collaborate with this creative writing exercise. Find a list of questions to guide them in descriptive poetry, with prompts and questions on the view from various windows.
 
WINTER SONGS AND POEMS:
http://www.canteach.ca/elementary/songspoems7.html
January is the month for... What do your preschool students suggest? Find several versions on the theme here, as well as numerous songs and poems for teaching about the winter season.
 
WORKING WITH POETRY:
http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1985/1/85.01.06.x.html
Taking an actor's approach to poetry, students will learn how to experience and respond to poems. Several theater games and exercises are included, as well as a great selection of possible poems to explore.
 
WRITE A POEM:
http://teacher.scholastic.com/lessonrepro/reproducibles/litplace/w970818a.htm
Use this printable template to help early elementary students compose their own poems, learning about both describing and rhyming words.
 

Contact:
Purpura, Linda 
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